Daddy Duck Attack

The Louisiana State University campus where I went to school years ago had lakes full of ducks, whose behavior made it clear that they owned the lakes; they marched, waddled and quacked behind whoever had a class near their home making it clear that if you were going to pass their home, you better bring bread.

Us students, could hear duck wings flapping, and a chorus of quacking, before we opened our eyes each morning, including weekends. Perhaps Roosters were born to awaken farmers and Ducks were born to motivate students.

Most of the ducks I passed were polite, but then, I had bread, if you didn’t pay your right of passage, you were greeted with the aggressive crowd.

The ducks knew which students were going to feed them, much like a waiter knows a good tipper, but if you expected to pass the pond without gratuity, you were immediately attacked, while the tippers were peacefully surrounded with wing flapping joy.

Incidentally, by the end of their first semester most students knew to leave the house each day with their books, and a bag of bread for the ducks.

Although, students had a lot on their mind, like exams, papers, and whatever else they needed for class, so occasionally a student would forget to bring the ducks food.

Consequently, one student’s memory lapse provided a Daddy Duck with an opportunity to teach the rest of us a valuable lesson.

In addition to entertaining the campus with the funniest thing most of us ever witnessed in public; this Daddy Duck reminded us to never step on his property without his family’s breakfast.

The morning the Daddy Duck lost his temper, I was sitting by one of the University lakes reading when I overheard a couple arguing in front of a pair of ducks. The voices of the arguing couple and the gander’s squawking sounded like an aggressive duck fight; and one loud enough to crack the eardrum of an elephant.

To be fair, this duck family wasn’t bothering anyone until the couple came along. They were minding their own business, trying to feed their ducklings breakfast and send them to duckling school when these people showed up and disturbed their morning.

Hence, one could understand why the daddy duck got his feathers in a ruffle over the human couple’s apparent rudeness and quickly charged in their direction.

When he approached the couple the man realized he was being challenged, so he put his hands in the air as if he were under arrest, but Mr. Gander was already in hot pursuit.

Everyone around the lake, including me, started laughing as this poor man kept shouting for help and backing away from his attacker. While the rest of the duck family squawked, the guy shouted and raised his fists as if demanding a fair fight from the creature, who continued his advance until he chased the guy down the sidewalk.

Then, later that morning, the weirdest thing happened, I was sitting in a boring history class, (reading a novel,) when I heard squawking again, only this time, I was in a classroom, so the honking, feather flapping argument, must have sounded like rocket fire in the hallway.

The classroom had three hundred theater style seats and two double doors at the entrance, so the students, including me, sitting in the seats near the entrance, could hear someone outside shouting, “Let go of me, ouch, let go of me,” followed by more squawking and honking, until the double doors to the classroom blasted open, and the same man was running from the daddy duck I saw earlier that morning.

I was astonished- How was this possible? Had this poor fellow been battling this duck since their war began? Then, instead of rescuing their fellow student, everyone began climbing to the top seats to get away from the dangerous creature; that was doing his best to sink his head low enough to nip the man’s heels and balance his wings at the same time.

The man ran up the row of seats with the daddy duck in hot pursuit nipping his ankles… while students were shouting, “Did you forget to give him bread?”

Finally, someone latched onto both man and duck, and the situation came to a screeching, honking, feather flying halt, leaving an entire classroom of students laughing hysterically.

This daddy ducks behavior that morning was one of the most valuable lessons I’ve ever learned without having to pay a penny or endure a consequence.

And the lesson was; there are strict rules when it comes to ducks; you should always bring bread, and never, interrupt a Daddy ducks, breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Why Choose Keeping Ducks? For Meat, Eggs, Or Pets?

Raising and keeping ducks is becoming popular nowadays, on par with raising chicken. Primarily raised for their meat, more than 20 million ducks are being raised in the United States every year. Though they lay fewer eggs compared to chicken, their eggs are larger and tastier, plus they contain more nutrients too. Keeping ducks for business is relatively less troublesome too since ducks requires non-elaborate housing facilities. Compared to chicken, ducks need less attention and less space for rearing.

In choosing a business, why pick keeping ducks? It is because they are considered one of the most versatile of the avian species. Their bodies are strong and can keep themselves well in wide ranges of climatic and nutritional conditions. These means that raising them is inexpensive.

Since they do not lay plenty of eggs, it is advised to keep the eggs for food or for hatching. Note that they actually can produce more eggs but they will have to eat more egg-laying feeds, 75 percent more compared to chicken, so it will not be economical.

Most raisers choose keeping ducks of the Pekin breed. The Pekin duck, also called the Long Island Duck, is a domesticated kind of duck, bred from the Mallard of China. They are better egg producers than other breeds and they gain weight quickly too. More than 90 percent of duck meat consumed in the US is from Pekin ducks. A 4-7 month mature Pekin duck, on the average, weighs about 9-10 pounds.

Housing for keeping ducks is also inexpensive. It can be made from light materials such as bamboo or wood. A space of about 3 to 4 square feet is advisable for every duck. As much as possible, the house should be placed in a nearby moving body of water like a stream. A pond or paddling pool may also work but regular water replacement, about once every two weeks, is advisable. Duck droppings can make the water green in no time. They need water bodies to swim and exercise. But only allow them to swim up to 2 hours so they don’t get over fatigued.

Poultry Farming – Ducks

If you’ve been thinking about getting into poultry farming, you may want to consider raising ducks. There are many different breeds to choose from and resources available to tell you how. Here are few suggestions to get you started.

Do some research. It helps to know what types of breeds of ducks are available to you. How you raise them largely depends on what you intend to do with them.

Some ducks are bred as pets and entered in poultry contests or sold to towns or cities to live in their ponds. Other varieties are valued for their meat and are given special diets to make them plump and desirable for the commercial market.

Duck eggs are prized in some cultures. Still, other breeds are praised for their self-sufficiency which enables farmers to raise them easily.

The type of ducks you select may depend on the amount and type of land you have. Generally, ducks require a yard large enough to allow for duck coops. It should have fencing to keep out predators.

If you’re going to raise ducks, it’s probably easier if you get them when they are young. They are usually easy to care for but may require more work than adult ducks may be.

When they are babies you can learn what types of food they eat, how to clean their coops and what temperatures are best for them. It may be harder to jump into the duck business starting with an adolescent or adult ducks.

The good news is that at about six months your ducks should begin laying eggs. Some ducks are better at laying eggs than others. A productive duck may lay as at least one egg a day. That should get you on your way to making some money on the endeavor.