Feeding Baby Ducks Properly – This Has a Direct Influence to the Overall Health of Your Ducks

Books on raising ducks have stressed the importance of a judicious feeding system in the overall health of poultry. If you’re raising ducks for profit, know that your ducks’ overall health has a direct influence on the profitability of your business. This means that if you want to rake in the profits, you’ll have to learn about feeding baby ducks properly.

Basic Feeding

In feeding baby ducks, you have to take into consideration the quantity as well as the quality of the food. You have to give what has the power to produce the largest amount of flesh and the leanest kind of meat. When these are attained, you can bet on your fowl business – no pun intended – to become ludicrous in no time at all. It’s not hard to find duck foods that can be bought in bulk and are of the highest quality. However, after you have accomplished this, you have to take into account the consequences that follow.

Common Problems

Fat hens are at high risk for a variety of diseases. Aside from this, they also cease to lay, prompting production to come to a halt – and your money to go down the drain. Fat drakes, meanwhile, usually become lazy enough to mate and do anything else. They are known to get apoplexy attacks and drop dead. These problems in feeding baby ducks can cause you your entire business. So, how do you avoid them?

Tried and Tested Solutions

It is imperative that you include unmedicated chick starter as well as unmedicated chicken grower feed when you’re in the early stage of feeding baby ducks. This way, they can get the nutrition they need without growing fat to the point of becoming useless, and stay safe from potentially fatal diseases. You must also include lots of water into their diet. Just make sure that the brooder litter stays dry and that the ducklings have no way of falling into the water container.

Weaning Means

When they mature, you’ll have to go about feeding baby ducks using chicken grower pellet feed, corn-grain scratch feed, and insoluble poultry feed. Customize your feeding schedule according to the habits of your ducklings, and switch to more protein-rich feeds once they turn into ducks.

What Ducks Can Teach You About Branding and Business Success

Of all the mascots I would expect a high-end luxury hotel to have, the lowly mallard duck is certainly not one of them. And yet, that was what greeted me when I stepped into the Peabody Orlando Hotel.

There is an actual story behind the ducks (which is printed on the napkins) but the reality is the story is less interesting than how the hotel has built a brand around ducks.

First, you have the “March of the Ducks” — at 11 am the ducks “march” (or more accurately waddle) on a red carpet to spend the day in a luxurious fountain. This fountain is located in the middle of the hotel and is actually quite a nice place to get a little work done or enjoy a coffee and cupcake (while watching the ducks splash around). At 5 pm they then “march” (waddle) back to their Duck Palace to enjoy a duck dinner and a “quiet evening” together.

Now the fact they make this an event — with marching music, a red carpet and an actual Duck Master (which is trademarked — yes if you were thinking about hiring a Duck Master for your own Duck March you would be out of luck) is one thing. But the ducks are also front and center to their branding.

There are ducks on the carpet, duck soaps in the rooms, drinks named after ducks, ducks embroidered on the staff’s clothes — the list goes on and on. It’s all quite tastefully done and the ducks are elegantly and subtly woven throughout the hotel’s brand and image.

Now the real question is, of course, is it worth it? Only the Peabody knows for sure but from the outside it certainly appears like it is.

First off, remember where the Peabody Orlando is — it’s in Orlando competing against Disney World (who knows a thing or 2 about branding themselves) Universal Studios and other theme-oriented attractions. Without the ducks, the Peabody would be a very nice, high-end hotel that would be like every other very nice, high-end hotel. With the ducks, now you have your own attraction. Now you have something to talk about. Now you have something your kids might want to see almost as much as Mickey Mouse.

(Now there is another Peabody, complete with ducks, in Atlanta as well. The Atlanta Peabody certainly wouldn’t be in competition with Mickey and company, but I suspect there’s enough other competition with high-end hotels and history that the ducks earn their keep there as well.)

One of the main ways you can successfully market yourself to an affluent clientele is to provide an experience. People like experiences. It gives them something to talk about (or write ezine articles about). And if you wrap an experience inside your brand, you just transformed yourself from a “good” business to something extraordinary. And extraordinary is what gets people to notice, to “take a chance on” if nothing else to witness that experience for themselves.

So, for you, what can you do to create an experience for your clients? And is this something that can be woven into your branding strategy? (And if you can make it unexpected or off-the-wall even better.) Or maybe it was an accident you overlooked at the time — with the ducks Mr. Peabody came back from hunting and was enjoying some Jack Daniels with a friend, when they decided it would be a nifty idea to put the duck decoys in the fountain. Well everyone loved the decoys floating around so now we have actual ducks in the fountain. (See what I mean about how lame that story is? But no matter, the point is they saw an opportunity and seized it — do you have any of those “happy accidents” in your own business you can capitalize on?)

Remember the point of a good brand is to make yourself memorable to your ideal clients. And a great way to make yourself very memorable is to wrap your brand around an experience.

Daddy Duck Attack

The Louisiana State University campus where I went to school years ago had lakes full of ducks, whose behavior made it clear that they owned the lakes; they marched, waddled and quacked behind whoever had a class near their home making it clear that if you were going to pass their home, you better bring bread.

Us students, could hear duck wings flapping, and a chorus of quacking, before we opened our eyes each morning, including weekends. Perhaps Roosters were born to awaken farmers and Ducks were born to motivate students.

Most of the ducks I passed were polite, but then, I had bread, if you didn’t pay your right of passage, you were greeted with the aggressive crowd.

The ducks knew which students were going to feed them, much like a waiter knows a good tipper, but if you expected to pass the pond without gratuity, you were immediately attacked, while the tippers were peacefully surrounded with wing flapping joy.

Incidentally, by the end of their first semester most students knew to leave the house each day with their books, and a bag of bread for the ducks.

Although, students had a lot on their mind, like exams, papers, and whatever else they needed for class, so occasionally a student would forget to bring the ducks food.

Consequently, one student’s memory lapse provided a Daddy Duck with an opportunity to teach the rest of us a valuable lesson.

In addition to entertaining the campus with the funniest thing most of us ever witnessed in public; this Daddy Duck reminded us to never step on his property without his family’s breakfast.

The morning the Daddy Duck lost his temper, I was sitting by one of the University lakes reading when I overheard a couple arguing in front of a pair of ducks. The voices of the arguing couple and the gander’s squawking sounded like an aggressive duck fight; and one loud enough to crack the eardrum of an elephant.

To be fair, this duck family wasn’t bothering anyone until the couple came along. They were minding their own business, trying to feed their ducklings breakfast and send them to duckling school when these people showed up and disturbed their morning.

Hence, one could understand why the daddy duck got his feathers in a ruffle over the human couple’s apparent rudeness and quickly charged in their direction.

When he approached the couple the man realized he was being challenged, so he put his hands in the air as if he were under arrest, but Mr. Gander was already in hot pursuit.

Everyone around the lake, including me, started laughing as this poor man kept shouting for help and backing away from his attacker. While the rest of the duck family squawked, the guy shouted and raised his fists as if demanding a fair fight from the creature, who continued his advance until he chased the guy down the sidewalk.

Then, later that morning, the weirdest thing happened, I was sitting in a boring history class, (reading a novel,) when I heard squawking again, only this time, I was in a classroom, so the honking, feather flapping argument, must have sounded like rocket fire in the hallway.

The classroom had three hundred theater style seats and two double doors at the entrance, so the students, including me, sitting in the seats near the entrance, could hear someone outside shouting, “Let go of me, ouch, let go of me,” followed by more squawking and honking, until the double doors to the classroom blasted open, and the same man was running from the daddy duck I saw earlier that morning.

I was astonished- How was this possible? Had this poor fellow been battling this duck since their war began? Then, instead of rescuing their fellow student, everyone began climbing to the top seats to get away from the dangerous creature; that was doing his best to sink his head low enough to nip the man’s heels and balance his wings at the same time.

The man ran up the row of seats with the daddy duck in hot pursuit nipping his ankles… while students were shouting, “Did you forget to give him bread?”

Finally, someone latched onto both man and duck, and the situation came to a screeching, honking, feather flying halt, leaving an entire classroom of students laughing hysterically.

This daddy ducks behavior that morning was one of the most valuable lessons I’ve ever learned without having to pay a penny or endure a consequence.

And the lesson was; there are strict rules when it comes to ducks; you should always bring bread, and never, interrupt a Daddy ducks, breakfast, lunch, or dinner.